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Love Heal Care

Travel, pets and infectious disease risks

20 March 2014

An important concept when dealing with infectious diseases is consideration of the risk that an animal has been, or will be, exposed to a particular microorganism. Some diseases vary greatly geographically, and something that’s very important in one region may be rare or non-existent in another. Good veterinarians are aware of disease trends in their area and make informed decisions about vaccination and anti-parasitic treatments based on what’s happening in the area. They also know which diseases are common and which are rare or non-existent.

But that only works if the pets stay in their “home” area. Traveling with pets can result in exposure to various infectious diseases they wouldn’t normally encounter. If a veterinarian doesn’t know a pet travels, they can’t make proper recommendations for preventive medicine.

Additionally, travel history can be very important when evaluating a sick animal, since there may be diseases that need to be considered in a traveling pet that wouldn’t be an issue with a local pet. However, it’s easy to overlook or forget about travel history. Pet owners need to tell their veterinarians about “recent” travel with their pets. What does recent mean? It’s hard to say. For some diseases, exposure within the past few days is all that’s important. For others, it may be weeks or months. So, if you have a sick pet and have traveled any time in the past year with it, it’s good to mention that to your veterinarian. It may have nothing to do with the current illness, but it never hurts to let them know anyway. In some situations, it may be the critical piece of information needed to trigger thinking about a specific disease.

Some examples of diseases that may be travel-related (at least to dogs in most parts of Ontario):

  • Blastomycosis, a fungal disease, tends to occur predominantly in specific areas. It’s not too common elsewhere, but travel to high-risk areas puts blasto on the list of possibilities in certain cases.
  • Around here, there’s no indication for heartworm preventive treatment during cold winter months, but that changes if the pet goes to areas where mosquitoes hang around all year.
  • Some tickborne diseases have very specific ranges that correspond to their primary hosts and certain vector species (such as birds). In Ontario, ticks are currently quite geographically focused and many dogs have little risk of exposure. Travel to one of the tick hotbed areas changes that, and means that certain tickborne diseases need to be considered.
  • Canine influenza currently seems like a non-entity in Ontario. We’re still looking for it but haven’t found it. It is present in some places in the US, and at times, is a big problem. Travel to a place experiencing a canine flu outbreak would be a good indication to consider canine flu vaccination.

What to do?

  • If you travel with your pet, part of your pre-travel checklist should be an appointment with your veterinarian to go over anything that needs to be done, be it vaccination, deworming, flea control, heartworm preventive or anything else. (It’s also a good time to make sure there’s nothing else going on with your pet, because you don’t want a pet health crisis en route.)
  • If your pet gets sick and has traveled, make sure your veterinarian knows where you went and when.
  • If you travel regularly, even if it’s not long distances, it’s good to discuss it with your veterinarian to see if anything is required for your pet. Even if you just go a couple of hours away to a cottage regularly during the summer, you may be exposing your pet to something different.

From Scott Weese’s Worms & Germs Blog

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